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Cannabis and Sexual Desire / Performance with the Fitness Enthusiast

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In Part 1 of our Marijuana and Muscle series (click here for the part 1 must-read), we talked about whether or not marijuana affects muscle strength, growth and fat loss.

There, we discovered that, “The dose makes the poison.” Consuming cannabis can alter your gains greatly if you are a chronic user, but specific dosages are tolerable if  you supplement with the right nutrients to cleanse and support your system. We also discovered that consuming too much of this herb results in a reduction of testosterone levels in both men and women.

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But how does marijuana use affect sexual desire? How does it mentally affect you? What effects does it physically have on the pelvis muscle region?

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Questions

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Although this is not normally a topic our blog would address, the amount of questions and curiosity, even amongst non-users, has caused us to sit down on the La-Z-Boy and scour the research. So here are the findings!

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Does Marijuana have an effect, good or bad, in the bedroom?

The answer is YESespecially with women.

But is it good or bad?

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Again, the effect can either be positive or negative based on—you guessed it—the dosage.

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The Science

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When a user ingests marijuana, chemicals in the plant ride the nervous system to the brain and latch onto molecules called cannabinoid receptors. These cannabinoid receptors influence pleasure, memory, coordination, and cognition, among other functions, which is why getting high affects thinking and behavior.

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marijuana affect on the brain

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So, it’s not far-fetched to assume that the endocannabinoid system influences sexual behavior, and thus, the studies pursued. There are also topical factors for women that have been studied but again, be aware of the bodybuilding demon belief that if a little works, a lot will work better.

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MEN – MARIJUANA – MUSCLE - SEX

This conversation comes up more and more because of the low testosterone studies from chronic marijuana consumption that we reviewed in Part 1. The fact is the more cannabis consumed, the lower the sperm rate and higher the erectile dysfunction issues. Don’t freak out just yet, guys. There might be a silver lining in that cloud for ya.

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I’ll give you the bad news first.

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Marijuana use has been shown to lower testosterone levels, and low testosterone levels can contribute to ED. Marijuana use has also been associated with orgasm-related problems. Likewise, a 2010 study published in the Journal European Urology found that marijuana may contribute to ED by inhibiting the nervous system response that causes an erection in the first place.

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Now, for the good news.

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Like many other conditions, psychology can also play an important role in erectile dysfunction. Men who suffer from ED often get performance anxiety, and this anxiety can make it even harder (pardon the pun) to achieve a sufficient erection. That’s where marijuana comes in.

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man covering his crouch

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Absent in an underlying medical condition, marijuana can help some men relax and overcome their performance anxiety, which can help them achieve an erection but again, the dose and supplementing with other nutrients is everything. We will get into that later. Let’s switch over to the ladies in the room.

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WOMEN – MARIJUANA – MUSCLE – SEX

Up until a few years back, no studies had been performed specifically with women concerning marijuana use and sexual desire. Several lines of evidence point to the potential role of the endocannabinoid system in female sexual functioning. These include results from studies describing the subjective effects of exogenous cannabinoids on sexual functioning in women.

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While these lines of research suggest a role for the endocannabinoid system in female sexual functioning, no studies investigating the relationship between concentrations of endogenous cannabinoids (i.e., arachidonoylethanolamide [AEA] and 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]) and sexual functioning had been conducted in any species.

Then, a study entitled “Circulating Endocannabinoid Concentrations and Sexual Arousal in Women” arose. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3856894/

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This study flipped the position we thought was true regarding cannabis consumption.

It showed that when the cannabinoids circulating in the system start to decline,

the desire, arousal and enjoyment improves with women.

However, if marijuana was circulating within the blood in high amounts, the desire, arousal, and enjoyment in women was reduced.

couple smoking in bed

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Based on this study, we can see the same concerns with dosage

(“The dose makes the poison”) and the effects of maui before it becomes WOW-ey.

But again, there are things you can do to help with the deleterious actions when

cannabis concentrations are too high (pun intended) in the blood.

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Sex Therapist Lawrence Siegel noted that delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol—the cannabinoid THC—appears to target a part of our brain associated with sexual arousal, at least in females.

What about the Stanford study and how does it relate to this finding? And what about men? Check this out.

Dr. Eisenberg, an Assistant Professor of Urology at Stanford University School of Medicine, and his colleagues conducted a study to see if there really was a connection between sexual desire, the amount of sex people had and marijuana.

 They found that overall, people that use marijuana tend to have more sex than those who have never partook.

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The study, published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, is based on surveys of more than 50,000 Americans ages 25 to 45, collected between 2002 and 2015. As part of a larger health questionnaire, participants reported how often they’d smoked marijuana during the past 12 months and how often they’d had intercourse with someone of the opposite sex during the past four weeks. 

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couple shotguning smoke

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Dr. Eisenberg and his colleagues crunched the numbers and found that the people who actually consumed marijuana had more sex. For both men and women, those who used marijuana had about 20% more sex than those who said they never used the drug.

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But the link was seen across all subgroups in the study—including people of both genders, different races, ages, and religions, those who were married or single, and with or without kids. This suggests that there may be something about the drug itself that boosts sexual function, says Dr. Eisenberg—or at the very least, doesn’t hamper it.

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If marijuana does, in fact, increase people’s desire for sex, it may have to do with the fact that cannabinoid receptors in the brain—which are activated by the drug—are known to be active during sexual activity.

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But Dr. Eisenberg says that marijuana’s effects on sexual function likely varies from person to person. In their paper, the authors cite a 2003 review of studies in which 51% of marijuana users reported increased sexual arousal while 26% reported a decrease. (In those same studies, however, 74% of people said they believed marijuana increased sexual pleasure.)

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couple holding hands in bed

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In 1970, Erich Goode, a former Professor of Sociology at Stony Brook University and an author, suggested that frequent, but not heavy marijuana use was associated with aphrodisiac effects in roughly 50% of users surveyed and increased pleasure in about 70% of subjects.

In a 1983 study published in The Journal of Sex Research, researchers interviewed a pool of mostly heterosexual, sexually active people on the perceived effects of marijuana use on sexual behavior. What they found supported Goode's results. About one-half of users reported an increased desire for their sexual partner, and over two-thirds of subjects said they experienced increased sexual pleasure and satisfaction after using marijuana.

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Cannabis has been used as an aphrodisiac in many cultures for centuries. In India, it was used as far back as the seventh century. Its use for sexual health was documented in Chinese texts, amongst Germanic tribes and by many African cultures.

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So what is the bottom line when it comes to sexual desire, satisfaction and cannabis use?

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When looking at all the research, you see that women are affected more in regards to sexual factors versus men. The one fact that remains the same is that the dose makes the poison, even in the bedroom.

The higher amount of cannabis in the system, the lower the desire and satisfaction for women

and the lower the ability to perform for men (goodbye testosterone).  

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The numbers seem to be pretty equivalent to that on performance from Part 1 on this subject.

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muscles and marijuana 10mg

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So, what are Gains in Bulk’s recommendations for the fitness enthusiast that does choose to legally consume cannabis? There is one caveat: organizations that preform Olympic WADA drug testing like the INBA/PNBA, test for THC. If you test positive, you will be disqualified, so be aware.

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For those who don’t have to worry about drug testing and are wondering how to gain the possible aphrodisiac benefits from cannabis, here are the official Gains in Bulk recommendations based on the research:

aphrodisiac with women, men, & marijuana?

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WOMEN

Plan your interactions soon after consumption of marijuana or a few hours later for the best chances of aphrodisiac effects.

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Remember, cannabis is not needed for sexual pleasure and this article was researched and written mainly for those who choose to take cannabis in one form or another but don’t want to diminish the muscle and fat loss gains made from a fitness lifestyle.

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NOTE: The takeaway secret comes down to improving blood flow and cellular strength.

N.O. Chews have the highest Nitric Oxide creating ability and an extremely high antioxidant rating with the 35 fruits and veggies packed into every dose.

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N.O. CHEWS with lighting